Tools for Measuring Auto Dealers' Twitter Accounts

If you’ve taken the advice of social media experts, you’ve started a twitter account and have been busy tweeting.  If you’ve been at it for a while, you probably have been wondering how you can measure your success beyond simple basic twitter stats.  Tracking and counting followers can get a little monotonous, and the whole time you are left wondering exactly what value you are getting out of your efforts. 

Face it, the total number of followers you have doesn’t mean much if they aren’t receiving your tweets, reading them and taking some type of action. We look to other stats to determine influence, like how often your posts are retweeted, how often you are mentioned in other tweets (this can be both good and bad), how often the links you share on twitter are clicked, etc. What all  this adds up to is influence; how well you interact, engage and influence your followers.  The good news is that you need not worry about developing your own scoring system as there are 6 tools that evaluate your influence.  These are really sound tools and, best of all, they’re all free!  

Most of these influence measuring systems take in a number of factors into that include follow count, but go far beyond it. While follower count can give you a brief measure of popularity, it does nothing to tell you how influential you are with those followers. If everyone is ignoring your tweets, 1000 followers doesn't mean any more than 10!  On the other hand, if you are being mentioned (@yourtwittername) and retweeted regularly, 100 followers can be more valuable than somebody else’s 2,000. In many cases the power is not in the original tweet but in the following retweets, so the power of twitter is all in the engagement.  Let's take a look at these influence measuring tools.

Klout

Pioneer in influence measuring.

Klout will measure your social influence across much of the social internet as it incorporates such sites as twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, FourSquare, YouTube, and more.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Klout has been the pioneer in influence measuring and has set the standard for social media influence.  You can set up Klout just to measure your twitter influence score, but it does so much more.   Klout will measure your social influence across much of the social internet as it incorporates such sites as twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, FourSquare, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, Blogger, WordPress.com, Last.fm and Flickr.  The Klout score measures your true reach, amplification, and network impact.

After entering your Twitter username into the box on Klout’s main page, you’ll see a page of topic scores. The prominent one being your Klout Score, which  is a number ranging from 1 to 100.  The Klout score takes many items into consideration, including number of followers, number of tweets, tweet topics, retweet frequency, and the Klout score of your followers.  I like Klout's reports on your top topics, who influences you and who you influence, and your Klout style (what type of social interaction player you are).

PeerIndex

Another popular social influence measuring tool is PeerIndex.

PeerIndex breaks it’s score down into 3 components, which are activity, audience, and authority.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

PeerIndex is another popular social influence measurement tool and is somewhat similar to Klout.  PeerIndex measures your influence over twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Quroa.   PeerIndex breaks it’s score down into 3 components, which are activity, audience, and authority.  It gives you a PeerIndex score ranging 1 to 100, lists your top topics, and lists your top influencers and people you influence.  PeerIndex also features a comparison tool for you to grade yourself against any tweep of your choice .   PeerIndex is a very nice social influence measurement tool and I particularly like its comparison feature.

Kred

The new kid on the social influence measuring block.

Kred places a much heavier emphasis on your ability to inspire action from your followers, which on twitter means retweets, replies and new followers.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Kred is the newest kid on the social influence measuring block released in 2011.  It was announced as the Klout killer when it was released, but it has yet to overtake Klout in this space.  Today Kred only measures your twitter influence, but it has announced that soon it will also  track your influence on Facebook and LinkedIn.  Kred places a much heavier emphasis on your ability to inspire action from your followers, which on twitter means retweets, replies and new followers.  Your Kred score is calculated based on reach and influence and looks something like this: 698/6. The first number is influence (based on a score ranging from 1 to 1,000) and the bottom number indicates your level of reach. Kred will also give you these scores for your selected areas of influence such as Marketing, Social Media, Tech, etc. 

Kred also has some other interesting features like “Get More Kred” where you can build your Online Kred.  Kred shows you a list of Trending Topics, which it says are growing and none of your followers have published anything about it.  You can then select individual topics and retweet them right from Kred.  I like Kred for the breakout scores by topic area and the Trending Topics feature.

Retweetrank

Simple, yet powerful influence measurement tool.

Simple, yet powerful influence measurement tool, Retweet rank also has a leaderboard of the most retweeted people on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  

Retweet rank might be the simplest influence measurement tool on our list, but it’s powerful nonetheless. The amount of times a Twitter account has been retweeted is calculated, and a number displayed based on the rank of that account. So, if you get a retweet rank of 200,000 for instance, that means you are the 200,000th most-retweeted person on Twitter.  And it  tells you just how you stack up in terms of what percentile you are in for receiving retweets.  The higher the number the better.

Retweet rank also has a leaderboard of the most retweeted people on Twitter.

Twitalyzer

Twitalyzer utilizes a combination of factors to calculate your impact including the number of followers you have, number of references and citations, how often you are retweeted, how often you retweet other tweeps, and the relative frequency at which you post updates.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  

Just enter your Twitter username and Twitalyzer will give you an Impact score ranging from 1 to 10 score, and also shows what percentile of all twitter users you rank.  This tool also supplies your Klout and PeerIndex score.  Twitalyzer utilizes a combination of factors to calculate your impact including the number of followers you have, number of references and citations, how often you are retweeted, how often you retweet other tweeps, and the relative frequency at which you post updates.  Twitalyzer also lets you know what type of Twitter influencer you are (Everyday User, Trendsetter, Social Butterfly, etc.), which can give you an idea of what you need to do to reach the next level.

Twitalyzer is the twitter data site with dozens of stats on its dashboard where it measures your engagement, influence, followers, lists, retweets and much more.  This data can really show you areas you can pay attention to in order to improve your twitter influence. 

Tweet Grader

Easy to use, Tweet Grader gives a score from 1 to 100 which measures the impact of your twitter account.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  

HubSpot has a number of very nice free tools and tweet grader is one of them.  It’s simple and easy to use.  It gives a score from 1 to 100 which measures the impact of your twitter account.  It measures the following factors in grading your account including your number of followers, power of followers, updates, update recency, follower/following ratio, and engagement.  Tweet grader also ranks your twitter account against all of the accounts it has graded and is monitoring, which at present is 9,442,912.  On occasion, tweet grader will also make some recommendations on what you can do to improve you score. 

All of these tools are great for competitive research as well.  Wondering how and what a competitor is doing on twitter, plug them into these tools and you’ll have a very good idea of what they are doing and how well they are doing it.  You'll then be able to draw up a more competitive campaign.