Fake Facebook Likes and the Trouble They Cause

by Naked Lime Marketing | Posted In: Social Media

Every so often the topic of fake Facebook “Likes” comes up, and with recent buzz about the number of fake “folks” on Facebook, it seems to be more popular than ever.  Facebook says it estimates the number at 8.7% of its user database (83.09 million accounts), while some experts tab it at roughly 22 to 25%.  Let’s not kid ourselves, fake accounts are prevalent on Twitter, YouTube, and many other social sites, as well.  But today I’m taking on the fakes on Facebook and why you should take care to avoid them.

Simply stated, buying fakes won’t help your dealership. In fact, this practice really can hurt your reputation and can tank your Edgerank score, which, in turn, can kill your message distribution to your real followers.

You ask: “Why do you think I may have bought fake Likes?”  Well, I’m confident you have if you worked with any of the hundreds of “agencies” that tout such claims as “Buy Facebook Fans/ Likes – New! 5,000 Likes Only $99.90” or “Buy 1000 Websites Likes for $29…Delivery Within 72 Hours.”  These companies are all over the place; just do a Google search for “buy Facebook Likes” to find some of them.  It seems so quick and easy and the number of Likes for the money is good, but…..

Real Likes will simply not happen at the level and price these vendors offer. The entity you’re doing business with may sprinkle in some real “Likes,” but the vast majority of what you’ll be buying are fakes.

This in turn, leads to the next question you may ask: “But I need to build up my Like numbers so that my dealership looks significant on Facebook and people will see they should Like and follow. How will buying fake Likes hurt?”

Facebook and other social media are about interacting and engaging with real people, and it’s those elements which determine whether you are successful.

Building up your number of “Likes” with fakes may help gain some attention initially, but people will figure out rather quickly whether you’re worth following based on your Facebook activity. And when they make the determination, they choose to unlike your fan page, or will just uncheck the “Show in News Feed” option and your messaging will vanish.  Or, they may not even bother to do that and just speed by your posting without a second glance.

Eventually, Facebook will just stop showing your messages to your followers because you now have a low Edgerank score.  You’ll still be sending the messages out there, only for them to die an ignored and lonely death.  This is how those many fake Likes can eventually lead to no real readers for your message.

For those unfamiliar, Edgerank is an algorithm developed by Facebook to determine and govern what information is displayed to individuals and its position in the News Feed. The problem with fakes is that we know that they are not going to interact with your Facebook posts, and this will cause a deterioration to your Edgerank score. In turn, this could lower your score enough to compromise the delivery of your posts to your real fans’ News Feeds, creating a downward spiral that further deteriorates your Edgerank.  All of which will eventually leave you with a Fan Page with a lot of Likes, but none of your followers ever receiving your posts in their News Feed.  And, all started by adding non-engagement fake Likes to your page.

Fake Facebook Likes are one of the snake oils of the digital age. They promise a quick fix, but only lead to disappointment. You are best to stay away from buying the fakes and stick with focusing on earning real Likes from real people through great content and interaction. Because, at the end of the day, Facebook is watching, and if your fans’ interaction (i.e., Edgerank Score) drops, you’ll be out of the news and not even realize it.

 



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